DAVE'S SONGS

Many people know me only as a guitarist. So here are some songs that I wrote and recorded, and sang.

FEATURED SONG

 

Our Yesterdays”

 

Copyright, 2017

Coal Room Music, ASCAP

All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Our Yesterdays was initially written around the time the first batch of my high school buddies started getting married. I had never arranged or recorded a song like it before, so not much happened with it for awhile. Once I bought my first house, my band finally had a small base of creative operations, in the tiny studio I cobbled together in the basement coal room.

As we were working on songs, I had this idea that tribal percussion and plaintive midwestern acoustic guitar might go together in interesting ways. This was the song and arrangement idea that really launched what a few of us then did with Blue Jordan Records artists, and many more.

Our Yesterdays was featured on a 9/11 anniversary memorial compilation CD, and received some radio play in the Midwest. In 2016, I cobbled together a nostalgic slide-show video comprised of photos I found on the web, which seemed like they captured the whole process of growing up.

Production tidbits:

  • Everything was recorded in my basement and Coal Room studio.

  • The beautiful bass work was done by Pete Throm.

  • Hand percussion was done by Josh Seurkamp.

  • Snare brushes were done by Scott Dill.

  • Guitars, piano, vocals, harmonica, and some percussion loops are me.

 

PREVIOUSLY FEATURED:

"Americana"

This sample mp3 is limited to the first minute or so of the song. For a full-length version, contact me on how you can get one.

davidx.c.eberhardtx@gmailx.com

(remove the X's)

Copyright, 2015

Coal Room Music, ASCAP

All Rights Reserved.

 

Americana was quickly written, partially inspired by the guitar riffs from Three Dog Night's "Shambala," and Cream's "Badge." I also acknowledge that it evokes something similar to King's X' "Mississippi Moon," though this came to my attention after the fact. I don't mind the association, but it wasn't planned.

Most men eventually learn this pain; that the object of one's affection has outgrown him, moved-on, and/or discarded him. Additionally difficult is when you see it unfolding in a friend's life, and know that he just can't hear it when you try to warn him. This song is fiction, but the sentiment is accurate to some of my past romantic misadventures.

Production tidbits:

  • Most of Americana was recorded in the basement and garage of my old house.

  • I played all the instruments except for the drums. Those are Scott Dill's handiwork.

  • There are too many guitar-tracks, all fighting to be heard, and mostly burying one-another.

  • I never liked the original solo, which was mostly just a repeat of the pre-chorus vocal melody, so I recorded a different solo, and regretted the change.

"Burning Virginia"

This sample mp3 is limited to the first minute or so of the song. For a full-length version, contact me on how you can get one.

davidx.c.eberhardtx@gmailx.com

(remove the X's)

Copyright, 2016

Coal Room Music, ASCAP

All Rights Reserved.

During a particularly dry Autumn when I was about 19, brush fires began to devour West Virginia. For months afterwards, you could drive through parts of the state (which I was doing fairly often at the time) and see small fires burning within plain view of the road. There is something unsettling about random roadside fires. Anyway, the wind shifted one night. I woke up late for a class at the University of Cincinnati (I wasn't a very good student, so this was not unusual) and saw what looked very much like a blanket of fog, but smelled very much like I was near a burning building. I hoped that somehow the UC campus had burned down (I probably had a test of some sort). No such luck. The shifting winds had brought the West Virginia smoke to my neighborhood. This song is about that experience. As it so happens "West Virginia" didn't fit into my lyrics, so "Virginia" it is. There really are no deeper meanings here, though those who knew me during and after this time could be justified for thinking so.

Production tidbits:

  • Burning Virginia was mostly recorded in the basement and garage of my old house. I re-recorded a few tracks in my current home studio.

  • Scott Dill played drums on this. I played all the other instruments and sang all the vocals.

  • When I was writing this song, rhythm had more of a swing to it, and the chords in the chorus reminded me of the theme to "Welcome Back Kotter."

  • I probably recorded the guitar solo 7 times, playing it almost exactly the same way each time. Although I was satisfied with each performance, I was never satisfied with the recorded sound I got. I decided the last attempt was good enough. This was more like a complete admission of defeat, than a decision to be content.